Account Navigation

Account Navigation

Currency - All prices are in AUD

Currency - All prices are in AUD
 Loading... Please wait...
Autism Coach

Lithium Liquid Mineral

$26.00

Lithium Liquid Mineral

$26.00
SKU:
GS-001
Weight:
0.10 LBS
Shipping:
Calculated at checkout
Quantity:
Share

Product Description

A highly absorbable form of the metal, Lithium, containing nano-sized Lithium particles sourced from ionized Lithium. This product was formulated to have an absorption rate of about 99%, while others can be as low as 5% or less. This product is suitable for vegetarians, containing only lithium and ionized water.

 Lithium is often used for neurological and mood support. Lithium can also be helpful by increasing the activity of brain messengers. Research indicates lithium is needed to transport B vitamins, including folate and vitamin B-12 into the brain. It is also theorized to increase activity of mitochondria.  Extremely low levels of lithium are found in individuals diagnosed with autism, suffering from anxiety, depression, dementia, diagnosd with ADD/ADHD, Biopolar/Schizophrenia, seizure disorder, Chronic Fatigue, migraines, fibromyalgia, measles, Epstein-Barr, addictive behaviors, aggresive/criminal behaviors.  The switch of many pregnant women to drinking purified bottled water may  lead to a deficiency in lithium in the developing fetus in areas, such as California. A lithium deficiency may be one of the contributing factors to children with autism frequently requiring high doses of specific B vitamins. 

Lithium is a naturally occurring mineral similar to sodium and potassium. Small amounts are present in most foods. Large amounts are used in the treatment of manic depression-also called bipolar disorder. The Wayne State team was studying lithium’s effects on manic depression when they discovered that this remarkable mineral can protect brain cells from premature death. In their Oct. 7, 2000 paper, they reported that lithium may even cause brain cells to regenerate after a loss from disease. - See more at: http://www.onlineholistichealth.com/alzheimers/#sthash.PWVuCFXj.dpuf
Lithium is a naturally occurring mineral similar to sodium and potassium. Small amounts are present in most foods. Large amounts are used in the treatment of manic depression-also called bipolar disorder. The Wayne State team was studying lithium’s effects on manic depression when they discovered that this remarkable mineral can protect brain cells from premature death. In their Oct. 7, 2000 paper, they reported that lithium may even cause brain cells to regenerate after a loss from disease. - See more at: http://www.onlineholistichealth.com/alzheimers/#sthash.PWVuCFXj.dpuf

A study done by The Lancet found, “Lithium exerts neurotrophic or neuroprotective effects“.  Neurotrophic refers to a family of proteins that induce the healthy development, function and survival of neurons.  Neuroprotective refers to processes within the nervous system that protects neurons from degeneration.  There has even been evidence that lithium may enhance the proliferation and specialization of neural stem cells.  This proves to be exciting because we know that brain cells are lost during the aging process, and the action of lithium on these cells seems to replace the lost brain cells.   

Lithium is a naturally occurring mineral similar to sodium and potassium. The Wayne State University team was studying lithium's effects on manic depression when they discovered it can protect brain cells from premature death and reported that lithium may even cause brain cells to regenerate after loss from a disease.  Lithium appears to provide neuroprotection and decrease risk of cancer by increasing levels of the protein Bcl-2, that protects the brain from injuries, chemical oxidants, an ionizing radiation.  Lithium also decreases the proten GSK-3b (glycogen synthase kinase 3b) that appears to participate in production of "neurofibrillary tangles" found in Alzheimer's patients.  The research results came from humans, rats, and brain cell cultures.  The patients all suffered from bipolar disease.  MRI scans of the brain were performed before and 4 weeks after lithium treatment.  Researchers found that the patients' brain gray matter increased by an average of 3 percent.

In an in vitro study of cultured brain cells, lithium was shown to increase brain cell survival.  When human brain cells were incubated in a lithium solution and exposed to two different toxins, the lithium treated cells showed up to a 220% increase in survival compoared to the control groups.

Depressed people who take lithium have a reduced incidence of Alzheimer's disease.

There is growing evidence that lithium is an essential mineral in the human diet.  Animals on low-lithium diets show reproductive problems, shorter life spans, poor fat metabolism, and behavioral abnormalities.  In epidemiological studies of people, low levels of lithium in drinkin water are correlated with a higher incidence of violent crime, suicide, drug addiction, and heart disease.  Lithium levels in the scalp hair of violent criminals and heart disease patients have been found to be lower than those in health volunteers.  El Paso, Texas, whose drink water has amongst the highest concentrations of lithium as the location most noted as a high-lithium, low-mental illness site.

 

Two proteins are key to lithium’s neuroprotective benefits. Bcl-2 (named for the B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 gene) protects brain cells from a variety of injuries, including chemical oxidants and ionizing radiation. Lithium is the first substance shown to increase the concentrations of Bcl-2 in brain tissue. - See more at: http://www.onlineholistichealth.com/alzheimers/#sthash.PWVuCFXj.dpuf
Lithium is a naturally occurring mineral similar to sodium and potassium. Small amounts are present in most foods. Large amounts are used in the treatment of manic depression-also called bipolar disorder. The Wayne State team was studying lithium’s effects on manic depression when they discovered that this remarkable mineral can protect brain cells from premature death. In their Oct. 7, 2000 paper, they reported that lithium may even cause brain cells to regenerate after a loss from disease. - See more at: http://www.onlineholistichealth.com/alzheimers/#sthash.PWVuCFXj.dpuf
Lithium is a naturally occurring mineral similar to sodium and potassium. Small amounts are present in most foods. Large amounts are used in the treatment of manic depression-also called bipolar disorder. The Wayne State team was studying lithium’s effects on manic depression when they discovered that this remarkable mineral can protect brain cells from premature death. In their Oct. 7, 2000 paper, they reported that lithium may even cause brain cells to regenerate after a loss from disease. - See more at: http://www.onlineholistichealth.com/alzheimers/#sthash.PWVuCFXj.dpuf

Clinical research has found lithium active in the following functions:

  • Protecting brain cells from toxicity
  • Promoting brain cell regeneration
  • Increasing gray matter of the brain
  • Regulating brain neurotransmitters
  • Supporting healthy mood balance
  • Improving blood sugar metabolism

Ingredients


Ionic Lithium from ionized lithium chloride, Ultra Pure Water.

Supplement Facts

Service Size - 10 drops

Servings Per Container:  100-

Lithium 500 mcg per serving

Bipolar patients commonly take 200 to 400 mg (elemental) lithium per day, which is approximately 1,000 to 2,000 mg lithium carbonate. (18) Because the blood levels of lithium citrate or lithium carbonate that have been demonstrated to be therapeutic are only slightly below the level that has been determined to be toxic, patients who take these prescription forms of lithium require regular blood tests to make sure their serum lithium concentrations stay below the toxic range. Adverse side effects and the inconvenience of frequent blood tests cause many patients to discontinue treatment with these prescription drugs. - See more at: http://www.onlineholistichealth.com/alzheimers/#sthash.PWVuCFXj.dpuf

Directions

Adults: Take 10 drops daily with 12 oz. water or juice. Children: Take 5 drops daily with 8 oz. water or juice.  Bear in mind that this form of lithium is more highly aborbable than in other forms.

Warning

Lithium should only be consumed as directed, unless indicated otherwise by a health care practitioner.  Bear in mind that this form of lithium is more highly aborbable than in other forms so much less is likely to be needed.  Signs of lithium toxicity include hypertension, tremor, nausea, and protein in the urine.  Anecdotally, symptoms of toxicity have been overcome by adding in 800 IU of Vitamin E and combined with oil high in DHA.  Bipolar patients common take 200 to 400 mg elemental lithium per day, which is approximately 1,000 to 2,000 mg lithium carbonate.  Because the blood levels of lithium citrate or lithium carbonate that have been demonstrated to be therapeutic are only slightly below the level determined to be toxic, patients to take prescription forms of lithium are required to get regular blood tests to make sure their blood levels of lithium stay below the toxic range.

Disclaimer:  These statements have not been reviewed by the FDA.  This product is not intended to diagnose, prevent, treat or cure any disease.

References

  • Moore GJ, et al. Lithium-induced increase in human brain grey matter. Lancet. 2000 Oct 7; 356(9237): 1241-2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11072948
  • Schrauzer GN.  Lithium: occurrence, dietary intakes, nutritional essentiality. J Am Coll Nutr. 2002 Feb;21(1):14-21. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11838882
  • Schrauzer G.N., Shrestha K.P., Flores-Arce M.P. Lithium in scalp hair of adults, students and violent criminals. Effects of supplementation and evidence for interactions of lithium with Vitamin B and other trace elements.  Biological Trace Element Research, 1992 Aug 34 (2): 161 – 76. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1381936
  • J.B. Adams, C.E. Holloway, F. George, D. Quig. Analyses of toxic metals and essential minerals in the hair of Arizona children with autism and associated conditions, and their mothers. Biological Trace Element Research. 110: 193-209, 2006. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16845157
  • Gregory J. Moore, Joseph M. Bebchuk, Ian B. Wilds, Guang Chen, and Husseini K. Manji, ‘Lithium-Induced Increase in Human Brain Grey Matter,’ The Lancet, Oct. 7, 2000, vol. 356, pp. 1241-1242.

  • Husseini K. Manji, Gregory J. Moore, and Guang Chen, ‘Lithium Up-Regulates the Cytoprotective Protein Bcl-2 in the CNS in Vivo: A Role for Neurotrophic and Neuroprotective Effects in Manic Depressive Illness,’ Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 2000, vol. 61, supplement 9, pp. 82-96.

  • Husseini K. Manji, Gregory J. Moore, and Guang Chen, ‘Lithium at 50: Have the Neuroprotective Effects of This Unique Cation Been Overlooked?’ Biological Psychiatry 1999, vol 46, pp. 929-940.

  • Trevor Silverstone, ‘Is Lithium Still the Maintenance Treatment of Choice for Bipolar Disorder?’ CNS Drugs, Aug. 14, 2000, vol. 2, pp.81-94.

  • Robert H. Lenox and Chang-Gyu Hahn, ‘Overview of the Mechanism of Action of Lithium in the Brain: Fifty-Year Update,’ Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 2000, 61, supplement 9, pp. 5-15.

  • Bjorksten, Johan. Pathways to the decisive extension of the human specific lifespan, J American Geriatrics Soc, 1977 a, 25: 396-399.

  • M. Anke, W. Arnhold, B. Groppel, and U. Krause, ‘The Biological Importance of Lithium,’ In: Lithium in Biology and Medicine, ed. G. N. Schrauzer and K. F. Klippel, VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, Weinheim, New York, pp. 147-167, 1991.

  • H. Klemfuss and G. N. Schrauzer, ‘Effects of Nutritional Lithium Deficiency on Behavior in Rats,’ Biol. Trace Element Res. 48, 131-139, 1995.

  • A. I. Fleishman, P. H. Lenz, and M. L. Bierenbaum, ‘Effect of Lithium upon Lipid Metabolism in Rats,’ Journal of Nutrition, 104, 1242-1254, 1974.

  • E. B. Dawson, ‘The Relationship of Tap Water and Physiological Levels of Lithium to Mental Hospital Admission and Homicide in Texas’. In: Lithium in Biology and Medicine, ed. G. N. Schrauzer and K. F. Klippel, VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, Weinheim, New York, pp. 147-167, 1991.

  • G. N. Schrauzer and K. P. Shrestha, ‘Lithium in Drinking Water and the Incidences of Crimes, Suicides, and Arrests Related to Drug Addictions,’ Biol. Trace Element Res. 25, pp. 105-113, 1990.

  • P. Blachly, ‘Lithium Content of Drinking Water and Ischemic Heart Disease,’ New England Journal of Medicine 281, 682, 1969.

  • G. N. Schrauzer, K. P. Shrestha, and M. F. Flores-Arce, ‘Lithium in Scalp Hair of Adults, Students, and Violent Criminals,’ Biol. Trace Element Res. 34, 161-176, 1992.

  • Ulrich Schafer, ‘Essentiality and Toxicity of Lithium,’ J. Trace and Microprobe Techniques, 15(3), 341-349, 1997.

  • C. N. Dufor, E. Becker, ‘Public Water Supplies of the 100 Largest Cities in the United States, 1962,’ Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1812, p. 364, 1962. Quoted in Ref. 15.

  • R. D. Barr and W. B. Clarke, ‘Regulation of Lithium Levels in Man: Is There Evidence of Biological Essentiality?,’ Lithium, 1994, vol. 5, pp. 173-180.

  • Eric O. Uthus and Carol D. Seaborn, ‘Deliberations and Evaluations of the Approaches, Endpoints and Paradigms for Dietary Recommendations of the Other Trace Elements,’ J. Nutrition 126, 2452S-2495S, 1996.

  • Forrest H. Nielsen, ‘How Should Dietary Guidance Be Given for Mineral Elements with Beneficial Actions or Suspected of Being Essential?,’ J. Nutrition 126, 2377S-2385S, 1996.

  • James W. Jefferson and John H. Greist, ‘Lithium in Psychiatry,’ CNS Drugs 1(6), 448-464, 1994.

  • Forrest H. Nielsen, ‘Ultratrace Elements in Nutrition: Current Knowledge and Speculation,’ The Journal of Trace Elements in Experimental Medicine 11, 251-274, 1998.

  • Carol Ann Rinzler, ‘Nutrition for Dummies,’ 2nd ed., IDG Books, 1999.

  • Mark Winter, University of Sheffield, England, www.WebElements.com.

  • Elisa G. Triffleman and James W. Jefferson, ‘Naturally Occurring Lithium,’ In: ‘Lithium and Cell Physiology,’ ed. R. O. Bach and V. S. Gallicchio, Springer-Verlag, New York, pp. 16-24, 1990.

  • Dean W. and English J., ‘Lithium Orotate: The Unique, Safe Mineral with Multiple Uses,’ Vitamin Research News, July, 1999.

  • Kling MA, Manowitz P, Pollack IW. Rat brain and serum lithium concentrations after acute injections of lithium carbonate and orotate. J Pharm Pharmacol 1978 Jun;30(6):368-70.

  • Sartori HE., Lithium orotate in the treatment of alcoholism and related conditions. Alcohol 1986 Mar-Apr;3(2):97-100.

  • Gregory J. Moore, Joseph M. Bebchuk, Ian B. Wilds, Guang Chen, and Husseini K. Manji, ‘Lithium-Induced Increase in Human Brain Grey Matter,’ The Lancet, Oct. 7, 2000, vol. 356, pp. 1241-1242.

    2. Husseini K. Manji, Gregory J. Moore, and Guang Chen, ‘Lithium Up-Regulates the Cytoprotective Protein Bcl-2 in the CNS in Vivo: A Role for Neurotrophic and Neuroprotective Effects in Manic Depressive Illness,’ Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 2000, vol. 61, supplement 9, pp. 82-96.

    3. Husseini K. Manji, Gregory J. Moore, and Guang Chen, ‘Lithium at 50: Have the Neuroprotective Effects of This Unique Cation Been Overlooked?’ Biological Psychiatry 1999, vol 46, pp. 929-940.

    4. Trevor Silverstone, ‘Is Lithium Still the Maintenance Treatment of Choice for Bipolar Disorder?’ CNS Drugs, Aug. 14, 2000, vol. 2, pp.81-94.

    5. Robert H. Lenox and Chang-Gyu Hahn, ‘Overview of the Mechanism of Action of Lithium in the Brain: Fifty-Year Update,’ Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 2000, 61, supplement 9, pp. 5-15.

    6. Bjorksten, Johan. Pathways to the decisive extension of the human specific lifespan, J American Geriatrics Soc, 1977 a, 25: 396-399.

    7. M. Anke, W. Arnhold, B. Groppel, and U. Krause, ‘The Biological Importance of Lithium,’ In: Lithium in Biology and Medicine, ed. G. N. Schrauzer and K. F. Klippel, VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, Weinheim, New York, pp. 147-167, 1991.

    8. H. Klemfuss and G. N. Schrauzer, ‘Effects of Nutritional Lithium Deficiency on Behavior in Rats,’ Biol. Trace Element Res. 48, 131-139, 1995.

    9. A. I. Fleishman, P. H. Lenz, and M. L. Bierenbaum, ‘Effect of Lithium upon Lipid Metabolism in Rats,’ Journal of Nutrition, 104, 1242-1254, 1974.

    10. E. B. Dawson, ‘The Relationship of Tap Water and Physiological Levels of Lithium to Mental Hospital Admission and Homicide in Texas’. In: Lithium in Biology and Medicine, ed. G. N. Schrauzer and K. F. Klippel, VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, Weinheim, New York, pp. 147-167, 1991.

    11. G. N. Schrauzer and K. P. Shrestha, ‘Lithium in Drinking Water and the Incidences of Crimes, Suicides, and Arrests Related to Drug Addictions,’ Biol. Trace Element Res. 25, pp. 105-113, 1990.

    12. P. Blachly, ‘Lithium Content of Drinking Water and Ischemic Heart Disease,’ New England Journal of Medicine 281, 682, 1969.

    13. G. N. Schrauzer, K. P. Shrestha, and M. F. Flores-Arce, ‘Lithium in Scalp Hair of Adults, Students, and Violent Criminals,’ Biol. Trace Element Res. 34, 161-176, 1992.

    14. Ulrich Schafer, ‘Essentiality and Toxicity of Lithium,’ J. Trace and Microprobe Techniques, 15(3), 341-349, 1997.

    15. C. N. Dufor, E. Becker, ‘Public Water Supplies of the 100 Largest Cities in the United States, 1962,’ Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1812, p. 364, 1962. Quoted in Ref. 15.

    16. R. D. Barr and W. B. Clarke, ‘Regulation of Lithium Levels in Man: Is There Evidence of Biological Essentiality?,’ Lithium, 1994, vol. 5, pp. 173-180.

    17. Eric O. Uthus and Carol D. Seaborn, ‘Deliberations and Evaluations of the Approaches, Endpoints and Paradigms for Dietary Recommendations of the Other Trace Elements,’ J. Nutrition 126, 2452S-2495S, 1996.

    18. Forrest H. Nielsen, ‘How Should Dietary Guidance Be Given for Mineral Elements with Beneficial Actions or Suspected of Being Essential?,’ J. Nutrition 126, 2377S-2385S, 1996.

    19. James W. Jefferson and John H. Greist, ‘Lithium in Psychiatry,’ CNS Drugs 1(6), 448-464, 1994.

    20. Forrest H. Nielsen, ‘Ultratrace Elements in Nutrition: Current Knowledge and Speculation,’ The Journal of Trace Elements in Experimental Medicine 11, 251-274, 1998.

    21. Carol Ann Rinzler, ‘Nutrition for Dummies,’ 2nd ed., IDG Books, 1999.

    22. Mark Winter, University of Sheffield, England, www.WebElements.com.

    23. Elisa G. Triffleman and James W. Jefferson, ‘Naturally Occurring Lithium,’ In: ‘Lithium and Cell Physiology,’ ed. R. O. Bach and V. S. Gallicchio, Springer-Verlag, New York, pp. 16-24, 1990.

    24. Dean W. and English J., ‘Lithium Orotate: The Unique, Safe Mineral with Multiple Uses,’ Vitamin Research News, July, 1999.

    25. Kling MA, Manowitz P, Pollack IW. Rat brain and serum lithium concentrations after acute injections of lithium carbonate and orotate. J Pharm Pharmacol 1978 Jun;30(6):368-70.

    26. Sartori HE., Lithium orotate in the treatment of alcoholism and related conditions. Alcohol 1986 Mar-Apr;3(2):97-100.

 

Product Reviews